Tuesday, July 18, 2017

New #yeahnoir: THE SOUND OF HER VOICE

A former New Zealand detective who investigated drug manufacture, child abuse, corruption, serious violence, rape and murder during his ten-year career has brought all his real-life experience with New Zealand's criminal underworld to bear in his debut crime novel, released on 8 August. 

Touted as a novel that will 'shock', and take readers into 'the real world of murky, disturbing, and downright terrifying policing', Nathan Blackwell's The Sound of Her Voice draws on real cases, with each chapter revealing a seemingly standalone crime. However, as the story unfolds, readers see that bit by bit prior horrors are 'inextricably woven into what happens next'.

The novel’s protagonist, Detective Matt Buchanan, unravels as he pieces together the crimes he’s trying to solve. Ultimately, it gets too personal, he goes too far, and, as the subtitle suggests, Buchanan descends into darkness.

The blurb: 
For Buchanan, the world is a pretty sick place. He has probably been in the job too long, for one thing. And then there’s 14-year-old Samantha Coates, and the other unsolved murder cases. Those innocent girls he just can’t get out of his head. When Buchanan pursues some fresh leads, it soon becomes clear he’s on the trail of something big. As he pieces the horrific crimes together, Buchanan finds the very foundations of everything he once believed in start to crumble. He’s forced across that grey line that separates right and wrong – into places so dark, even he might not make it back.

The author: 
Nathan Blackwell was raised on Auckland’s North Shore and attended Westlake Boys’ High School before commencing a ten-year career in the New Zealand Police. Seven of those years were spent as a Detective in the Criminal Investigation Branch, where he was exposed to human nature at its strongest and bravest, but also at its most depraved and horrific. He investigated a wide range of cases including drug manufacture, child abuse, corruption, serious violence, rape and murder. Because some of his work was conducted covertly, Nathan chooses to hide his true identity.

In his former capacity as a detective, Blackwell says he found sexual offending the hardest to deal with. “The victims are re-living it, over and over, attempting to deal with surviving the most horrific traumas. As a cop, your job is to be the sounding board, the voice of hope, the link between them and the wheels of the legal system. It's a very tough, long process. I think I've tried to bring that out in the book. I definitely worked harder on those cases than anything else, because you get to know those people. You see them take the stand to give evidence, holding it together, giving it everything. And then the lawyers break them down. It's horrible.”

The publishers say "this astonishing novel will grip you and will stay in your head long after you’ve finished reading it". It will be published in New Zealand on 8 August. Keep an eye out for it.

I have a copy on my bedside table, and am very excited about diving in.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Review: UNFAITHFUL UNTO DEATH

UNFAITHFUL UNTO DEATH by Jennifer Barraclough (2016)

Reviewed by Karen Chisholm

This black comedy with serious undertones is set in an English rural general practice during the 1980s. Dr Cyril Peabody, whose application for promotion in hospital medicine has been rejected on the grounds of "personality problems", takes a post as a country doctor. Too arrogant to admit that he is out of his depth with the job, he develops a cynical attitude towards his patients, and finds himself in continual conflict with the senior partner and with his new wife Rosamund. Problems escalate even further when Rosamund attempts to run a drug trial and gets romantically involved with the pharmaceutical rep. Then the local community is affected by a series of unexplained illnesses, both human and canine, and suspicious deaths.

The unaware, vaguely idiotic central character provides a deep mine of material for any type of slightly tongue in cheek story-telling, and UNFAITHFUL UNTO DEATH uses the premises in setting up Dr Cyril Peabody from the outset of the novel.

Cyril is perpetually disappointed in life. He has been stymied in his career path, forced to take a (in his opinion) menial job as a country GP, married a woman who is only just satisfactory, and generally living a life that he feels has been affected constantly by the wilfulness of others. Obviously he's completely incapable of seeing that he's the problem. He's boorish, prissy and prone to conflation of his own worth. He's basically a tiresome individual.

Writing about these sorts of characters is a tricky undertaking, as balance between time spent with somebody who is absolutely slappable and actual advancement of plot, hopefully to where Dr Cyril gets his comeuppance, has to remain engaging for the reader.

Alas UNFAITHFUL UNTO DEATH dwells a lot on the man, which whilst you can see there is humour there, the joke becomes thin quickly. There's even something oddly off-putting about wife Rosamund, who if anybody had a right to some happiness, alas has her own overly annoying quirks without enough of the humour to humanise her.

It has to be noted that humour of this type is a difficult undertaking as a reader's experience is greatly affected by their relationship with the Rosamund and Dr Cyril. Overall, a little more acuity and balance between the ego of Cyril, the passivity of Rosamund and plot advancement would have helped this reader a lot.

Karen Chisholm is one of Australia's leading crime reviewers. She created Aust Crime Fiction in 2006, reviews for Newtown Review of Books, and is a Judge of the Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Novel and the Ned Kelly Awards. She kindly shares and republishes her reviews of crime and thriller novels written by New Zealanders on Crime Watch as well as on Aust Crime Fiction

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Review: LIFTING

LIFTING by Damien Wilkins (VUP, 2017)

Reviewed by Alyson Baker

Amy is a store detective at Cutty’s, the oldest and grandest department store in the country. She’s good at her job. She can read people and catch them. But Cutty’s is closing down. Amy has a young baby, an ailing mother, and a large mortgage. She also has a past as an activist.

This compelling novel opens in a police interview room, with Amy narrating the weeks leading up to the chaotic close of Cutty’s, a time when the store moves from permanent feature to ruin and when people under stress do strange things. An intense exploration of the moment when the solid ground of a life is taken away, this swiftly told novel shows again how unerringly and vividly Damien Wilkins traces the stress fractures of contemporary living.

Amy is a new mum, still coming to terms with having a ‘family’, her husband has moved from a job where he smelt of coffee all the time to one where he stinks of petrol, they have problems with the neighbours, her mother is ailing and her elder sisters judgemental – but all in all things are OK.

Amy is also surrounded by crime, she is a store detective at Cutty’s, a large Wellington department store, she was an animal rights activist in her youth, and from experience knows that most people have infringed at some point in their lives.  And Amy is being interviewed by the Police, and the interview has something to do with an incident during the disturbing last few weeks, the weeks since the announcement of the closure of Cutty’s.

Lifting drifts through these few weeks, and through Amy’s memories as she becomes quite disengaged from her life, observing her child, her husband, herself much as she observes the shoppers in the store. She wonders about moving away from ‘security’ work, thinking that it puts her in constant proximity to low-level criminals, but then again maybe that’s exactly where she wants to be? Amy uses her power of ‘discretion’ with the ‘persons of interest’ she spots as she pretends to be a fellow shopper, thinking she has a moral compass, but isn’t she just random with her grace and with her decisions to act?

The closure of the store becomes a metaphor for the disintegration of an era – with its sexist doormen, the sensual face-to-face rather than face-to-screen shopping experience, the tea and cream buns after the first bra fitting, and the various methods of shoplifting; brazen to furtive, but all on an individual, human level – not the horrific violent gang raids on dairies and service stations we see on TV, not the impersonal mass cyber robberies we read about.

"It was tempting to believe that venturing outside the crumbling world of Cutty’s would bring you even closer to the apocalypse and that gangs of wild children carrying improvised weapons wandered the streets …".

And there is Gerty Cutty, the last surviving member of the founding family, an embodiment of the store’s long and shady past.Amy is intrigued by her and wonders if her sad farewells to the store aren’t also a good riddance, she watches her driven away: “A small hand waved at the window as the car pulled away”.

As the staff of Cutty’s work through the final weeks, some getting jobs, some still hoping for a final reprieve, no one really has a handle on the situation – large items go missing, is it theft or part of the wind-down of the store?  And the staff start eyeing up items themselves, to buy or …  And interspersed in the narrative is the Police interview – which crime great or small is being investigated?  Is Amy a suspect or helping with the investigation?

As the store at once winds down and also starts preparing for a final sale – they are flying people down on a special flight from Auckland for it – there is a sense that something has gone very, very wrong. Lifting is inconclusive and ambiguous, even the title can refer to petty crime or to triumphant moments, it harkens to a time of clarity and certainty that probably never existed on an individual level, not even in youth, and definitely not in any previous era.  It is a lovely read about the passing of time and how every now and again that passage leaves you unmoored for a while.

Alyson Baker is a crime-loving librarian in Nelson. This review also appears on her blog, which you can check out here

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Review: STRAIGHT AND LEVEL

STRAIGHT AND LEVEL by Penelope Haines (2017)

Reviewed by Alyson Baker

The sequel to Death on D'Urville sees Claire Hardcastle involved in another adventure. The night Claire meets newly arrived property developer Jim Mason is also the night she has a chance conversation with investigative journalist Andrew Camborne, who's been researching reports of crime and corruption on the Kapiti Coast. 

Later, Claire witnesses an altercation between the two, and the next morning, Andrew's body is found. Is it an accident, or homicide? When Claire and Jim's daughter are abducted, Claire is forced to fly her kidnappers to a remote hideout. Thrust into a world of eco-terrorism, drug-smuggling, and violence, the two women have to use all their initiative to survive.

Claire Hardcastle is a twenty-something pilot working for a small aviation  outfit on the Kapiti Coast.  Her new, still finding out about each other, partner is a cop – and currently off in the Solomon Islands on secondment – leaving their relationship at the Skype level. She loves flying and is studying for more qualifications, she is swearing off alcohol for a good cause, and enjoying the mix of work, friends and living alone with her cat, Nelson.

But not far into the novel Claire starts meeting a range of intriguing characters, getting odd flying assignments, and being in the vicinity where bodies are being found. Claire doesn’t end up unravelling the mystery so much as getting swept along into it – her piloting skills being of great interest to both the good guys and the bad guys.

She is a great character, a mix of pizazz and composure – and very human, she gets a rumbling tum at a very tense moment, and fleetingly thinks she didn’t really need to have changed the sheets during a torrid sex scene. It is great to have the males the ones who are agonising over relationships, and eliciting “Magnificence in a man can be so transitory” comments about their physiques.

The plot involves drugs, gangs, rich people, Maori sovereignty and a very whacky attempt at bio-terrorism, but somehow it all hangs together. And there are a few red herrings along the way.

The settings are great – the beautiful Kapiti Coast, the Marlborough Sounds and the misty Uruweras, are all described to great effect, often from the air. The technical information about flying is absorbing – on more than one occasion I thought of taking lessons!

This is the second Claire Hardcastle outing and a third is on the way. Well worth a read.

Alyson Baker is a crime-loving librarian in Nelson. This review will also appear on her blog, which you can check out here

Monday, July 10, 2017

Review: THE LATE SHOW




















THE LATE SHOW by Michael Connelly (July 2017)

Reviewed by Craig Sisterson

Renée Ballard works the night shift in Hollywood, beginning many investigations but finishing none as each morning she turns her cases over to day shift detectives. A once up-and-coming detective, she's been given this beat as punishment after filing a sexual harassment complaint against a supervisor.

But one night she catches two cases she doesn't want to part with: the brutal beating of a prostitute left for dead in a parking lot and the killing of a young woman in a nightclub shooting. Ballard is determined not to give up at dawn. Against orders and her own partner's wishes, she works both cases by day while maintaining her shift by night. As the cases entwine they pull her closer to her own demons and the reason she won't give up her job no matter what the department throws at her. 

Michael Connelly's thirtieth novel is a bit of a curveball for long-time readers, but he absolutely smashes it out of the park. For the first time in many years, there's no Harry Bosch or Mickey Haller. Instead, a new hero, young detective Renee Ballard, a beach-loving Hawaiian who's been relegated to the midnight shift in Hollywood after speaking up against her former supervisor's sexual harassment.

Ballard was a star on the rise, but now she's persona non grata with many former colleagues in the prestigious Robbery Homicide division. Instead, she spends the early hours of the morning being called out to all manner of incidents, beginning investigations before passing them on to the daytime detectives. She's a shepherd of crime, more than a crime solver. But Ballard won't allow her current situation to push her out of the police force. She's determined to make a difference, to help victims.

Although she has a partner, the pair of detectives on 'the late show' (the nickname for the midnight shift) have to cover the entire week between them, so end up working some nights solo. Ballard's partner Jenkins is a solid detective, but is often now just punching the clock, eager to get home to spend time with his ailing wife. He doesn't share Ballard's burning drive to go the extra mile.

When on one night there's a credit card theft, a trans prostitute is brutally beaten and put in a coma and a bar worker is caught up in a nightclub multiple murder, Ballard finds it hard to let either of the latter two cases go. Despite the fact that her old nemesis, Lieutenant Olivas, takes over the nightclub investigation with his crack RHD team, and makes it very clear he needs no help from her.

Ballard is on the outside looking in, but won't let that stop her trying to find the truth.

Even if it puts her career, and her own life, on the line.

Connelly absolutely nails the tricky balance between familiarity and freshness with The Late Show. For long-time fans, Ballard has some Bosch-like characteristics (trouble with her superiors, extremely driven, solves crimes in LA) while being a fascinating, fully-formed character all of her own too.

It's easy to see why The Late Show is already being touted as the start of a new series, rather than a standalone. Renee Ballard is a wonderfully intriguing character, who gets more and more interesting as the book goes on, and we learn a little more about her. She is fierce, has a different way of looking at the world, and faces issues as a female detective that haven’t been addressed in other Connelly tales. I was curious as to how Connelly might handle writing from the perspective of a female detective, but he does it with aplomb and authenticity (I understand the character was inspired in part by a real-life LAPD female detective who Connelly has known for many years).

The Late Show starts well and gets even better as the pages turn, as we learn more about Ballard and her LA world, and are handcuffed by a sublimely wrought crime tale.

A brilliant start to a new series from a true master of the craft.

Note: The Late Show will be released by Orion Books on July 11 in the UK and Ireland, by Allen & Unwin on July 12 in Australia and New Zealand, and by Little, Brown & Company on July 18 in the USA and Canada.

Craig Sisterson is a lapsed lawyer who writes features for leading magazines and newspapers in several countries. He has interviewed more than 180 crime writers, discussed crime writing onstage at literary festivals in Europe and Australasia, and on national radio and top podcasts, has been a judge of the Ned Kelly Awards, and is the Judging Convenor of the Ngaio Marsh Awards. You can follow him on Twitter: @craigsisterson

Thursday, July 6, 2017

9mm interview: Kristen Lepionka

Welcome to the latest instalment in the 9mm series! I'm very grateful to all the terrific crime writers who've generously given their time over the past few years. You can see the full index of author interviews here. If you've got a favourite author who hasn't yet featured, leave a comment, and I'll make it happen.

Today, I'm very pleased to welcome debut crime writer Kristen Lepionka to Crime Watch. Lepionka is from Columbus, Ohio (in the United States), and her first book, THE LAST PLACE YOU LOOK was released by St Martin's Press in the United States in Spring, and by Faber & Faber in the UK today.

It's the first book in Lepionka's Roxane Weary mystery series, and sees the private investigator struggling with the death in the line of duty of her policeman father, while also digging into a past case that put a man on death row. As the days tick down to an execution, Weary realises there might be a link to one of her father's own unsolved cases; a missing teenage girl.

It sounds like a great premise. In an early review, Kirkus Reviews said "Lepionka’s debut confidently portrays complex characters with multiple, sometimes contradictory, motivations and offers an unusually naturalistic perspective on sexual identity."

But for now, Kristen Lepionka becomes the 166th crime writer to stare down the barrel of 9mm.


9MM: AN INTERVIEW WITH KRISTEN LEPIONKA

Who is your favourite recurring crime fiction hero/detective?
I adore Jack Reacher. The books are pure fun to read--suspenseful and thrilling across the series--and Reacher is definitely the type of hero I’d want on my side in a fight. I also really appreciate that the various women who occupy the books (and Reacher’s bed) are smart and tough--no damsels in distress.

What was the very first book you remember reading and really loving, and why?
Sam the Cat Detective by Linda Stewart. It’s a middle-grade book from the 90s that I read when I was probably seven or eight, and even though I had no idea what noir was at the time, I fell in love with this. It’s an adorable story about Sam, a cat/private investigator who lives in a mystery bookshop in Manhattan, as he investigates the theft of a necklace. I’d never read a mystery before, and I just loved the concept of reading a book and solving a puzzle all at once. My younger self was very satisfied by this. I’ve re-read it as an adult and it’s actually a great kidlit adaption of a PI novel--all the classic tropes are there, except cats. I can recite entire passages by heart.

Before your debut crime novel, what else had you written (if anything) unpublished manuscripts, short stories, articles?
I have a handful of short stories (some published, some not) and a few other manuscripts which will never see the light of day.  I think a big part of being a writer is figuring out what kind of writer you are...and I definitely didn’t know when I wrote some of these things. I actually wish I was better at short stories. Some people really have a knack for it but it’s such a tricky format, at least in the crime genre.

Outside of writing, touring and promotional commitments, what do you really like to do, leisure and activity-wise?
Reading as much as possible, of course. I’m also a graphic designer so I do a fair bit of that in my spare time. And I love to travel, too.

What is one thing that visitors to your hometown should do, that isn't in the tourist brochures, or perhaps they wouldn’t initially consider?
Not sure Columbus, Ohio, has any tourist brochures. But we probably should. Most people don’t know it, but we’re actually a big city. If you’re a whiskey drinker, go to Wing’s. They’ve got a whiskey list that’s about a mile long. Then, head down the street to the Drexel Theatre to take in an independent film.

If your life was a movie, which actor could you see playing you?
The movie of my life would be called Woman Carries Laptop to Different Rooms of the House and would consist of thirty-three years of typing sounds. So I don’t think an actor is needed. But I’ve been told that I have a resemblance to 1970s-era Stockard Channing, so sure, why not.

Of your books, which is your favourite, and why?
THE LAST PLACE YOU LOOK is my fave, of course, because it’s the one that found me my agent and publisher. I’m pretty excited about book two in the series, too, though.

What was your initial reaction, and how did you celebrate, when you were first accepted for publication? Or when you first saw your debut story in book form on a bookseller’s shelf?
Absolute shock, which has yet to wear off, honestly. The thought of people—strangers!—reading something that existed only in my head for so long is still a bit trippy. In the best possible way, of course. To celebrate, I bought myself a new laptop, and then I went back to work.

What is the strangest or most unusual experience you have had at a book signing, author event, or literary festival?
I’m pretty new to this, so I haven’t been to enough book-related events to have any strange experiences yet. Looking forward to having a great many this summer, though.


Thank you Kristen. We appreciate you chatting to Crime Watch

You can read more about Kristen Lepionka and her tales at her website, and follow her on Twitter




Monday, July 3, 2017

Review: ELEMENTARY - BLOOD AND INK

ELEMENTARY: BLOOD AND INK by Adam Christopher (Titan Books, 2016)

Reviewed by Alyson Baker

The Chief Financial Officer of a secretive NYC hedge fund has been found murdered—stabbed through the eye with an expensive fountain pen. When Sherlock Holmes and Joan Watson discover a link between the victim and a charismatic management guru with a doubtful past, it seems they may have their man. But is the guru being framed? 

As secrets are revealed and another victim is found murdered in the same grisly fashion, Holmes and Watson begin to uncover a murky world of money and deceit…

I was thrilled I was going to be able to review a Sherlock Holmes novel written by a Kiwi. And Blood and Ink started off well enough – but this Sherlock Holmes is the one from the television series Elementary, and as the story progressed it became obvious he doesn’t have much in common with the classic Holmes.

In fact, the only two examples of Holmesian deduction in the book – where Holmes deduces specific facts about people with seemingly supernatural insight, and then explains his method as a series of fine observations – lacked the latter part of the device, ie we have no idea how he knew what he knew as Watson “having worked with Holmes for so long … simply took his observation, deduction, induction, whatever it was, on face value”.

Holmes isn’t really at the centre of this story of financial espionage at all – he is just part of a team with Joan Watson and NYPD’s Captain Gregson and Detective Bell. The story is almost exclusively told from the point of view of Watson; the main contribution Holmes makes to solving the case comes via a group of dark net hackers whom Holmes pays for information with online Monty Python performances!

The mystery itself is OK – the CFO of a top New York hedge fund is found dead in a seedy hotel with an exceedingly expensive fountain pen stuck through his eye and into his brain. It is soon clear to both the characters and the reader that the ‘obvious’ suspect is being framed – and there are a few twists and turns before a solution is reached – but the end isn’t a surprise and the arc of the storytelling quite flat.

As I don’t watch the television series I can’t say how faithful this book is to its Holmes and Watson – I just know that not only is it set in a different city and a different time from the original Holmes – it is part of a different literary universe.

Alyson Baker is a crime-loving librarian in Nelson. This review first appeared on her blog, which you can check out here

Friday, June 30, 2017

Review: THE STUDENT BODY

THE STUDENT BODY by Simon Wyatt (Mary Egan Publishing, 2016)

Reviewed by Karen Chisholm

A popular fifteen-year-old girl is strangled to death at a school camp on Auckland's west coast. The posing of the body suggests a sexual motive. Nick Knight, a week into his role as a newly promoted Detective Sergeant, is tasked with the critical job of leading the Suspects Team. Nick - who turned his back on a lucrative career as a lawyer - is well-versed at dealing with the dark sides of human nature. With no shortage of suspects, he sets out on the trail of the murderer, grappling his own personal demons along the way. But are things really as they seem?

In case you hadn't noticed there's a number of debut novels recently out of New Zealand, often written by authors with a policing or related background, many of them telegraphing potential for interesting things to come. THE STUDENT BODY is Serious Fraud Office investigator Simon Wyatt's first novel, written while on sick leave recovering from a rare, and potentially life-threatening autoimmune disorder.

The central character in this novel, Detective Sergeant Nick Knight, is a little bit different from current day crime fictional norms in that he's a young, not yet cynical cop, in a murder enquiry team after a few years of adult sex crimes investigations. Readers may see something in the link between his experience of sex crimes, and the death of a young female student, found semi-naked, strangled and dumped in the bush near a school camp. From the circumstances, sexual motivation is upper-most on everyone's mind. But there are secrets to be found amongst her family, school teachers and friends, the community around the camp, as well as those in her home neighbourhood.

Wyatt's background in policing is very obvious in THE STUDENT BODY, deployed to great effect when revealing the inner workings of CIB, not as effective when describing characters in ways that have more than a whiff of wanted poster about them. It's obviously an extremely difficult balancing act to get the information on internal workings and readability right though, and whilst at some level details can be fascinating, it's not quite as successful when the reader can't quite shake the sense of an exam coming up. Having said that the personal touches: the baking provided by lower ranks in the team, and the difficult family dynamics, in particular, are well done.

Because the story is told from Nick's point of view it's hard to avoid the idea that he might not be seeing the full picture on some things and his observations about family members, relationships with colleagues etc have just the slightest feeling of unreliability about them. On the other hand, there's some nice sprinklings of humour dotted throughout and not just the gallows style that could be expected in a police procedural.

It's in the shadows of Nick's personality that there's particularly interesting hints. He's not perfect, he's self-centred, and on the face of it his difficult relationships with a lot of people could be coming from both sides. Which probably also sums up THE STUDENT BODY. It's not perfect, it's got the odd continuity issue, a few clanging terminology / naming problems, and an ending that reads like a lot of heavy lifting of a lot of elements in a big hurry. Overall, however, THE STUDENT BODY is a promising first take, and it will be worth seeing what happens in any follow-up novel.


Karen Chisholm is one of Australia's leading crime reviewers. She created Aust Crime Fiction in 2006, reviews for Newtown Review of Books, and is a Judge of the Ngaio Marsh Award for Best Crime Novel and the Ned Kelly Awards. She kindly shares and republishes her reviews of crime and thriller novels written by New Zealanders on Crime Watch as well as on Aust Crime Fiction